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THE MAN OF THE MONTH

Published in The Crowsnest - November 1948 - Page 9

The man of the month in November 1948 is P.O. Tel A.L. Bonner. This article is of interest because it gives a bit of information on how it was to be a Telegraphist and Telegraphist (V) during World War II and until 1948. These trades were later reclassified as Radioman (Sparker) (Radio Lady) and Signalman. The H.M.C. Signal School, later known as the Naval Communications School (Comm School), was first located at the Halifax Dockyard and was relocated to St. Hyacinthe, Quebec. during World War II. See the article in December 1948 about the Comm School being relocated again to part of the Electrical School in Halifax.

  Click here to open the magazine, then go to page 9 

 

THE FAST SUBMARINE

Published in The Crowsnest - December 1948 - Pages 8 and 9

The Type XXI German U-Boat is a problem. It is up to us, as professional anti-submarine sailors, to gain the know-how and alertness to beat it. It can be done because it must.

  Click here to open the magazine, then go to pages 8 and 9 

 

THE COMMUNICATIONS SCHOOL

Published in The Crowsnest - December 1948 - Page 20

According to this article,  the Naval Communications School (Comm School)  was relocated to a part of the Electrical School in Halifax around 1948. Prior to 1948 and during the Second World War, the Comm School was located in St. Hyacinthe, Quebec. Before WWII, the school was located in the Halifax Dockyard.

 

So far as I know, the Comm School was relocated from Halifax to Cornwallis in 1953.

 

The Comm School was still at HMCS Cornwallis when I was there in 1965. It was relocated to HMCS Naden on the west coast in 1966 after a trial in which I participated. I was in the first RM Trade Group 1 class on the west coast in 1966.

 

Also note that a Radioman (RM) was a Telegraphist (Tel) back in 1948. The Radioman (RM) later became a RAD SEA 251 in the late 1960s. The nickname Sparker was common in the 1940s and 1950s and was still used in the 1960s and 1970s. Another nickname was Radio Lady.

  Click here to open the magazine, then go to page 20 

 

HOW THE NAVY LENT A HAND

Published in The Crowsnest - March/April 1965 - Pages 10 and 11

TRAGEDY IN VILLE LASALLE, QUEBEC

28 DEAD INCLUDING 15 CHILDREN - 30 OTHER PERSONS IN THE HOSPITAL

THE ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY LENDS A HAND

Back in 1965, anyone joining the Royal Canadian Navy who could not speak English had to undergo extensive English language training for a few months at HMCS Hochelaga in Ville Lasalle, Quebec before going to HMCS Cornwallis in Nova Scotia for basic training. This was my situation. I spoke only French so I first went to HMCS Hochelaga.

 

In addition to English language training, Hochelaga also offered daily P/T and drill training so we would have a head start when arriving in Cornwallis.

 

When I arrived at HMCS Hochelaga in May 1965, I heard some horrific stories about the recruits picking up body parts two months earlier when an explosion destroyed an apartment building nearby killing 28 persons, including 15 children, and sending another 30 persons to the hospital. Had I arrived two months earlier, I most likely would have been involved in this horrendous task.

 

Although this tragedy happened two months before I reported to HMCS Hochelaga, I thought I might mention it here because a lot of people have forgotten about this tragic event when the Royal Canadian Navy "lent a hand".

  Click here to open the magazine, then go to pages 10 and 11 

 

NAVY THANKED BY CITY OF LASALLE

Published in The Crowsnest - May 1965 - Page 2

A thank you note from the City of Lasalle to the Navy Supply Depot, to HMCS Hochelaga and to the Royal Canadian Navy for the assistance given during the tragedy of March 1, 1965.

  Click here to open the magazine, then go to page 2 

 

MULTIPLE MENTIONS OF INTEREST

Published in the Sentinel - November 1965

New Single Canadian Forces Communications System (page 43)..... HMCS GRILSE proudly steams into port (page 43)..... Commissioning of HMCS OJIBWA (page 44)..... Launching of HMCS ONONDAGA (page 44..... A new morse code translator (page 44).

  A copy of this magazine will be available on this website soon 

 

THEY OPEN MILL COVE

Published in the Sentinel - March 1968 - Pages 14 and 15

This article deals with the opening of Naval Radio Station NRS Mill cove in 1968 which replaced NRS Albro Lake as the receiving site of the main naval radio station on the east coast (Call Sign CFH). The transmitting site for CFH was in Newport Corner at the time, and is still there today.

  A copy of this magazine will be available on this website soon 

 

THE VOICE OF THE PACIFIC

Published in the Sentinel - September 1968 - Pages 26 and 27

An article on the main naval radio station on the west coast (Call Sign CKN) consisting of the transmitting site at Matsqui and the receiving site at Aldergrove.

  A copy of this magazine will be available on this website soon 

 

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